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Skrim- What is Skrim?

Posted by The Plastic Sheeting Gurus! on Wed, Apr 01, 2015 @ 12:31

Skrim...have you seen it used before? Or should it be, "Scrim"?  Or maybe it is spelled, "Skryrim"?  No- it's "Skrim" right?

SKRIM

According to some lisings on the internet, Skrim is a mountain of Buskerud, in sourthern Norway! Really? Did you know there was such a mountain named, Skrim?

What about Skrim spelled, "Skyrim? Again when searching for "Skrim" you come up with Skyrim which is an action role-playing video game! Did we get that right?

Then we find that "skrim" is also spelled, "scrim"!  Scrim is another word for gauze- a very light textile made from cotton or sometimes flax. Scrim can be light weight and translucent which makes it very useful when making curtains. Scrim is also used in making book bindings and upholstery. Scrim is well-known for it's use in the theater. There is a variety that is used for special effects. This variety of scrim/skrim is called, "sharkstooth scrim".  In the theater world, if someone uses the word scrim, they can be referring to a thin screen made out of a wide variety of materials.  Scim can have a rectangular weave.

Where does that leave "scrim"?  There is another plastic sheeting product called, "Poly Scrim".  This is  polyethylene plastic with layers of string reinforcement placed between the layers of poly to make a strong plastic sheeting product that won't tear, and can stand up to wind and harsh conditions, In this case, scrim is referring to the string mesh that is placed within the plastic sheeting. When string reinforcement, often made of nylon, is added to plastic, it allows for hems, drains, elastic cord, webbing handles and more to be made from the plastic.  Poly Scrim can also be made in a fire retardant version. Now you have a skrim/scrim/string reinforced plastic sheeting product that has a multitude of uses.

There you have it- a look at the word, "skrim" and it's many adaptations.

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